Media Together: Advertising and Sales

As with all industries, the spread of Covid-19 has put strains on all facets of the media industry, including marketing, advertising and editorial teams. As part of an ongoing project, Adweek has solicited stories of those who have been furloughed, laid off or otherwise affected by the pandemic. If you’ve been affected, please consider submitting your story here.

What’s your experience been like during Covid-19?

Covid has been challenging. I’ve been laid off for three weeks now and just trying to stay grounded, but I do have moments of anxiety and discomfort. I understand that its a competitive job market so I’ve been patient, but NYS unemployment has been extremely difficult to navigate and bills need to get paid. It’s a delicate balancing act managing my emotional and mental well-being while applying for unemployment, relevant jobs and networking on LinkedIn.

Bernice Veloz

What’s your hope for the media industry post-Covid-19?

The industry is quite fascinating right now, ripe with innovation and ideas. My hope is that brands shift the narrative to forge a more authentic relationship with audiences. We’re all in this together. It’s been great to see brands pivot to address this.

What is your motivation behind working in the industry? What are some memorable experiences you’ve had during your employment in the media industry?

This industry is my calling. I am a multicultural marketing guru in training that loves shaping the narrative of how brands connect with this unique and special audience. My entire career has been quite memorable, both good and bad. One of my favorite memories is working the Latin Grammy Awards with Univision on behalf of Metro by T-Mobile. The event is grandiose; the collaboration and camaraderie among all the brands, agencies, media platforms to bring the night of life was incredible to experience firsthand.

Source: https://www.adweek.com/digital/media-together-advertising-and-sales/

 

In everything your brand does, context matters. Beyond the most basic actions taken to help protect businesses and employees during crisis situations, brands will either help or hinder the collective experience. When a cultural moment occurs and dramatically affects the world, as it has during the  COVID-19 pandemic , it’s crucial that brands address this issue with a sense of tact,  mindful marketing , and empathy.

With that in mind, when it comes to existing and planned campaigns, modern marketing teams face unique and often unplanned challenges during the Crisis. Even though it is still early during the quarantine process, many businesses are already adjusting the way they communicate with clients and customers. With that in mind, you can find some general guidelines here for marketing your business in this unusual situation.

 

 

01

Adjust Scheduled Content Timelines and Marketing Campaigns

There are many brands that can create fast-turn campaigns designed for a specific moment. An example of this was Ford when vehicle ads were swapped for a  campaign focused on the Coronavirus response . While these are impressive, there are some prohibitive risks that make this type of war-room action unachievable and unrealistic for most businesses.

The first step for a brand to consider is what is currently running or in the pipeline, including pre-scheduled content that is set to launch soon. During this audit, consider the following:

·         Determine what to pause right now

·         Consider what to pivot or prioritize

The good news is that taking a break from content may provide an advantage after things get back to normal. Right now, it’s a good idea for you to prepare for upcoming cultural moments (i.e., post-quarantine) and figure out what content will be most impactful and relevant then.

02

Evaluate the Language and Imagery Being Used

There’s no question that visual communication is powerful, along with the words that are used. It’s crucial to think about what type of message your brand is conveying. Some things to look at and consider changing include:

·         Remove or avoid the use of visuals where people or crowds are touching

·         Reframe your marketing language that may describe a close interaction with others

·         Swap out your visuals if needed

Take some time to see what changes you can make that would be beneficial to the Crisis right now.

03

Don’t Try to Capitalize on the Crisis

This is applicable to any crisis or tragedy, but it is especially important to remember in the existing climate where fear and worry are top of mind. While it’s a good idea to keep people informed about how the Crisis is affecting the business, make sure you aren’t spread panic or become an alarmist.

When it comes to marketing through this Crisis, keeping the tips and information here in mind can be invaluable. Being informed is the best way to ensure you are able to make it through this Crisis unscathed and that your customers see your efforts during this difficult time.

 

Source: https://www.inc.com/peter-roesler/tips-for-responsible-smart-marketing-during-covid-19-pandemic.html 

6 CAREER CHALLENGES IN THE COVID-19 CRISIS AND WHAT YOU CAN DO

By: May Busch

I’m sharing tips on what you can do if you’re facing these challenges too. So as you read through, take a moment to reflect on which of these you recognize in your own situation.

1. Keeping spirits up

People are finding it hard to stay positive with the uncertainties and unknowns that lie ahead. Even those who are normally positive are picking up negativity from the news and the fears of people around them.

What you can do:

It’s much easier to feel positive when you’ve had enough sleep, water, nutritious food and exercise. So, this is a great time to prioritize your self-care and take the time to “put on your own oxygen mask first before helping others”.

At the same time, see if you can limit your exposure to negative news or people, especially if these tend to trigger your worst fears and anxieties. Note that your self-care will help you remain more resilient to those triggers.

Keeping your spirits up is easier when you look for the opportunity within the situation.

2. Finding a job

Economic uncertainties are leading many organizations to put hiring plans on hold, cut back on the work they give out, or resort to layoffs. The financial pressure this puts on earners and their families is a significant challenge for which there are no easy answers.

What you can do:

On the financial side, this is a good time to “run the numbers” so you know what it costs for you and your family to live each month and how that balances out against your income and financial reserves. The answers you find can make you feel better or motivate action, whether that’s reducing costs, building up savings, finding another stream of income or a mixture.

On the job search side, this is the time to keep connected with your network and broaden it. According to Harvard Business School, 65-85% of jobs are found through networking and that’s where you should focus about 80% of your time. (So don’t overinvest in those job boards!)

As you approach your job search, remember to take an inventory of your strengths, skills and experiences. Think broadly about where and how you can leverage these to add value. Don’t be afraid to pivot when you need to.

Above all, stay positive (see #1 above) and keep going.

3. Being productive

Working from home comes with distractions whether it’s news feeds, social media notifications, family members you want to spend time with, or children who are being “home-schooled”. And not everyone has a “home office” set up that makes it easy to concentrate.

What you can do:

Recognize that with any change comes a temporary loss of productivity, including positive events like moving to a better office space or changing jobs after a promotion. This situation is even more distracting, so cut yourself (and your team) some slack.

Give yourself permission to change your work routine to better suit your current situation. For instance, if you used to leave home before everyone else woke up but you’re now on breakfast duty with the kids, you’ll need to do some rearranging.

Do your best to set up your workspace and structure your time so that you can focus on what matters most. If you live with others, agree on some boundaries for when it’s “do not disturb” time. And make sure you schedule in break times and actually take them – it’s an important ingredient for staying productive.

4. Adjusting to online meetings (and all things virtual)

Conducting meetings, doing business and building your network of relationships online is challenging. Especially when you’re used to doing things in-person. It’s not only the technology, but also learning new “norms” for when and how to communicate.

What you can do:

First and foremost, make sure you’re staying connected with others virtually. That means making friends with your video conferencing system. It’s literally your window on the world when it comes to communicating with your team, colleagues, boss, and clients.

If the tech is new to you, get someone to help – think of it as another way to connect with a colleague. And if you’re a pro, offer to help others. They’ll appreciate it.

When it comes to networking, be creative about translating your “in-person” strategies to a virtual version. Whether that’s setting up a virtual coffee, convening a group discussion, or making e-introductions, experiment with different formats to find out what works for you.

The more you practice, the more confident you’ll be. And remember, you’ll be developing a useful skill to have even after we emerge from this crisis.

5. Motivating team members in these hard times

For leaders and managers, it’s challenging to ensure you’re doing the right things to motivate team members and support them, especially if virtual working drags on.

When you can’t see each other, you can’t pick up on the non-verbal cues about how someone is doing. And not knowing what’s going on can easily lead your imagination to go to the worst-case scenario (“could my whole team really be binge-watching Netflix box sets in their pajamas instead of working?”).

What you can do:

In uncertain times, your team needs to hear from you, even if you don’t have all the answers. Make sure you’re visible and available to them. This is when people need your leadership more than ever.

At the same time, strike the balance between showing your support and intruding on their workday. When in doubt, ask them for the best times and ways to connect with them. And be prepared to treat each person the way they want to be treated – it’s not one-size-fits-all because your team members aren’t all the same.

Your team members are probably reluctant to reach out to you and interrupt your workday, and there are fewer natural ways to do the equivalent of stopping by your desk to ask a question. So find your way to make it “okay” for people to contact you.

Some leaders I know have set up virtual office hours when they’re available on video conference. Others have a daily virtual huddle with their direct reports, who then can cascade that down to their teams. Experiment with various ways and be prepared to be flexible and change course to suit the needs of your team.

And when you do get on that video call, remember to start by asking each person to share how they’re doing before you dive into business. It not only shows you care, it’s an essential way to the create common ground needed for a productive conversation.

6. Preparing for advancement

For some, the COVID-19 crisis limits their options for taking on new projects and showing the boss they’re doing the right things. For others, it’s a period of “downtime” they can take advantage of to prepare for advancement, but they’re not sure how. Both situations can feel stressful for achievement-oriented professionals.

What you can do:

Recognize this as a golden opportunity to get creative about demonstrating leadership, investing in yourself and enriching your life and career.

We will emerge from this crisis, and the important question is:

How are you using this time to emerge better and stronger?

Whether it’s polishing up on the soft skills that could be beneficial to prospective employers, getting trained on a new skill, developing another earnings stream, or taking a step back to reflect on where you want to take your career, look for ways to make the most of this time.

Don’t spend it in ways you’ll regret later – like staying glued to the newsfeed or worrying about things you can’t control (a personal favorite!).

Instead take action (yes, “baby steps” count!) and invest in the 2-3 things that will set you up for success going forward.

Finding Our Way Together

If you’re facing some or all of these challenges, you are not alone. We’re all finding our way forward in this time of unprecedented change and uncertainty. Together, we will prevail.

And keep learning, keep growing and keep going.

Source: https://www.theladders.com/career-advice/6-career-challenges-in-the-covid-19-crisis-and-what-you-can-do

How COVID-19 is Changing the Email Marketing Landscape

The coronavirus pandemic is gradually changing the email marketing landscape, with brands avoiding the direct promotion of their products.

Africa Studio / Shutterstock.com

The email marketing landscape is currently changing. But how?

The coronavirus pandemic has hit the United States hard in the last month. As a result, several states have put lockdown procedures in place and assured residents that essential services would be available.

Meanwhile, brands are also providing regular updates to their customers on practical matters. These include health and safety, as well as protocols and availability of delivery and other services.

As necessary as it is to stay in touch with your clients right now, sending emails can also backfire.

This is especially true when the message is coming after years of silence — or the email doesn’t serve the customer in any way. Such an action could feel like “jumping on the bandwagon” to customers.

Don’t get us wrong. Jumping on the bandwagon can be useful.

It’s called cultural marketing and can be a powerful tool when used correctly.

However, the current situation has made it necessary for brands to walk a fine line in their marketing endeavor.

You don’t want to look like you’re ignoring the coronavirus pandemic. At the same time, you also don’t want people to think you’re trying to cash in on it.

Yes, it’s a very subtle distinction. However, this has forced a significant shift in email marketing.

Impact of Coronavirus on Email Marketing Landscape

The new coronavirus emails from brands don’t look like marketing at first glance.

That’s because few of these messages outrightly advertise products. For example, companies may not advertise prom dresses right now, even though it’s prom season.

Instead of mentioning products, brands are now focusing on broader email marketing and branding strategies.

Along with providing health and safety information, the emails also brand their parent companies as reliable, sanitary, and ethical. These are descriptors that tend to attract consumers right now.

In a Kantar survey of over 35,000 consumers, 78 percent believe brands should help them in their daily lives during this pandemic.

Seventy-five percent say brands should inform them of what they’re doing. Meanwhile, 74 percent think companies should not exploit the situation.

With that said, a vast number of consumers don’t think brands need to stop advertising during the COVID-19 pandemic. In fact, only 8 percent of consumers said that companies should stop marketing altogether.

Most consumers agree that it’s crucial to use reassuring tone, offer a positive perspective, and communicate brand values in this period.

Source: https://edgy.app/how-covid-19-is-changing-the-email-marketing-landscape?fp=a1&pfrom=marketing

 

The Importance of Content Marketing During Coronavirus Pandemic


As cases of the coronavirus (COVID-19) increase internationally, brands have begun scrambling to navigate the pandemic – both internally and externally. In the past week alone, for example, notable big-tech conferences like IBM’s Think, SXSW, and Adobe Summit were canceled due to COVID-19 concerns. In response to coronavirus, many marketing teams are forced to switch gears and think of alternative outlets, away from event marketing, to accelerate pipeline while keeping the health of others in mind.

 

The challenges for marketers during coronavirus outbreak

On average, 30-40% of marketing budget is allocated for trade show sponsorship, travel, expenses, attendance, and collateral. With the coronavirus blowing up trade show budget, marketers are challenged to redistribute that budget quickly. 

Amid the fear of attending and sponsoring large events, marketers are turning to content marketing delivered directly to subscribers online to stay engaged with their customers. Content marketing has evolved from being just blog posts and editorial strategies. It’s a holistic approach that relies on a broad range of digital marketing strategies tactics such as email, social media, SEO, and paid media to continue engagement with customers.

With the cancellation of upcoming events, you need to extend your digital content marketing efforts to ensure consistent and timely communication with your customers. A great example of this could be seen by IBM. Although IBM’s Think in San Francisco has been recently canceled, they are rebooting the event as a new ‘digital’ conference scheduled for early May. In preparation for this event, IBM is relying on interactive content to maintain the event’s values and missions without the risk of travel.

What is content marketing?

Content marketing is a type of digital marketing in which brands develop an on-going relationship with customers through content that is non-promotional and provides value at every touch. Over the years, content marketing has evolved from being just blog posts and editorial strategies but a holistic approach that relies on a broad range of digital marketing tactics such as email, social media, SEO, and paid distribution to reach a target audience.

Unlike advertising, content marketing is not overtly promotional. Rather, content marketing allows brands to become storytellers and provide important information especially during times of crisis. Your customers and prospects seek out content that entertains, inspires, educates, and informs. Content marketing tactics will help keep you create an on-going relationship during, and even after, the coronavirus pandemic. 

The importance of content marketing

Content marketing can become an effective way for you to remain in touch with your customers and increase pipeline generation during the coronavirus pandemic. With the ever-changing digital landscape, communicating and engaging with your audience can remain undisrupted, no matter what the situation is – as long as you have the proper content marketing strategies in place.

Since trade shows are primarily used for demand generation initiatives and pipeline acceleration, focusing on digital lead generation channels becomes vital. Many marketers would say that increasing digital spending will increase lead volume, but quality can vary. Some would argue that the quality of leads generated at trade shows can also vary – as long as the leads are carefully vetted, pipeline generation will increase without having to rely on trade show participation.

As we see more event closures, brands should follow IBM’s innovative lead and adapt their previous plans to become digital events. In doing so, brands will have the opportunity to globally scale their events and increase engagement – further proving the importance of content marketing. Digital events will allow you to become storytellers en masse and provide consumers with the content of value increasing brand awareness and engagement. Customers and prospects seek out content that entertains, inspires, educates, and informs – a strong content strategy will give you the opportunity to leverage important elements from experiential marketing online.

In challenging times and a fast-changing global landscape, communicating brand identity and values remains important. Coronavirus provides a new challenge for marketers that shines a light on the importance of relying on strategies outside of traditional channels (while expected to remain agile). The goal of experiential marketing during the coronavirus outbreak is to invest in similar experiential and content marketing strategies delivered through online platforms. Ensure your customers are aware that you are still available and interested in their business throughout 2020.

Moreover, no matter how you’re approaching this situation – both from a health as well as a marketing standpoint – it is important that we maintain a healthy and safe environment.

Source: https://insights.newscred.com/importance-content-marketing-during-coronavirus-pandemic/

Tips for Responsible and Smart Marketing During the COVID-19 Pandemic

 

It’s crucial that brands address this issue with a sense of tact.

 

In everything your brand does, context matters. Beyond the most basic actions taken to help protect businesses and employees during crisis situations, brands will either help or hinder the collective experience. When a cultural moment occurs and dramatically affects the world, as it has during the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s crucial that brands address this issue with a sense of tact, mindful marketing, and empathy.

With that in mind, when it comes to existing and planned campaigns, modern marketing teams face unique and often unplanned challenges during the Crisis. Even though it is still early during the quarantine process, many businesses are already adjusting the way they communicate with clients and customers. With that in mind, you can find some general guidelines here for marketing your business in this unusual situation.

Adjust Scheduled Content Timelines and Marketing Campaigns

There are many brands that can create fast-turn campaigns designed for a specific moment. An example of this was Ford when vehicle ads were swapped for a campaign focused on the Coronavirus response. While these are impressive, there are some prohibitive risks that make this type of war-room action unachievable and unrealistic for most businesses.

The first step for a brand to consider is what is currently running or in the pipeline, including pre-scheduled content that is set to launch soon. During this audit, consider the following:

+ Determine what to pause right now

+ Consider what to pivot or prioritize

The good news is that taking a break from content may provide an advantage after things get back to normal. Right now, it’s a good idea for you to prepare for upcoming cultural moments (i.e., post-quarantine) and figure out what content will be most impactful and relevant then.

Evaluate the Language and Imagery Being Used

There’s no question that visual communication is powerful, along with the words that are used. It’s crucial to think about what type of message your brand is conveying. Some things to look at and consider changing include:

+ Remove or avoid the use of visuals where people or crowds are touching

+ Reframe your marketing language that may describe a close interaction with others

+ Swap out your visuals if needed

Take some time to see what changes you can make that would be beneficial to the Crisis right now.

Don’t Try to Capitalize on the Crisis

This is applicable to any crisis or tragedy, but it is especially important to remember in the existing climate where fear and worry are top of mind. While it’s a good idea to keep people informed about how the Crisis is affecting the business, make sure you aren’t spread panic or become an alarmist.

When it comes to marketing through this Crisis, keeping the tips and information here in mind can be invaluable. Being informed is the best way to ensure you are able to make it through this Crisis unscathed and that your customers see your efforts during this difficult time.

Source: https://www.inc.com/peter-roesler/tips-for-responsible-smart-marketing-during-covid-19-pandemic.html?icid=landermore

 

 

 

The Stoic Secret That Can Help Your Business Now

How do you recover when things don’t go your way? A classic strategy, from the book, “The Daily Stoic” can help you find power in any situation

The strongest creatives and business owners don’t wait for perfect timing, inspiration or conditions, but are constantly moving forward based on their habits. One of the smartest skills you can learn is turning a perceived loss into a win. This so-called “reverse clause” goes back to philosopher Marcus Aurelius. Here’s how it can empower your life.

How to turn an obstacle into a triumph

In The Daily Stoic, Ryan Holiday talks about the reverse clause, or turning an unplanned setback into a victory. If you are stuck at home with your kids, then you can turn that into an opportunity to grow closer to them. If your traditional work is on hold, you can find a way to pivot into services people need now.

As Holiday writes in his book: “When a technical glitch erases our work, our reverse clause is that we can start fresh and do it better this time. Our progress can be impeded or disrupted, but the mind can always be changed–it retains the power to redirect the path.”

Boost your gratitude

Sometimes it is easier to be grateful because of other habits. For example, by using a reverse clause, you begin to see the power of your current position–and automatically have gratitude for being in it.

I recently talked about the simple practice of replacing “have to” with “get to,” which ties directly to the reverse clause idea.

Instead of saying you “have to” go on the fundraising road show because your startup is burning through money fast, switch it to you “get to go” on the fundraising road show because my startup represents something you truly believe in, and you have faith this is something worth pursuing. Believe that you are the rare person who actually can put the time and energy into something you care about.

The goal, then, isn’t to wait until the tide turns your way. To paraphrase Warren Buffett, it is to maximize the wave you’re riding on.

Source: https://www.inc.com/damon-brown/the-stoic-secret-that-can-help-your-small-business-now.html